Common Questions and How we answer them

My puppy isn’t eating, what do I do?

I’m sorry to hear you think your puppy isn’t eating. Did you purchase the same food the puppy was on at the kennel or switch the diet? (either Evangers or Annamaet brand).

Change of diet answer- The puppy probably doesn’t like the food that you purchased since it isn’t what he is used to. We highly recommend purchasing the food that the puppy was used to eating since a abrupt change in diet can cause lack of appetite and diarrhea, which can lead to other issues.

Same diet answer- Puppies can be stressed with a change of environment or overly stimulated by too much playtime, both of these things can cause the puppy to eat less.

How many bowel movements is the puppy having?

-if the answer is 0-2
You’ll want to add something to the food to entice the puppy to eat more. Things like chicken broth, boiled chicken, or hamburger meat are good options and usually get the puppy more interested. Puppies eat primarily by scent and this will help entice the puppy to eat.

-if the answer is 3 or more
The puppy seems to be eating enough if he/she is having 3 or more bowl movements per day. It seems that you are doing a great job. Keep up your meal time routine since it is working but please don’t hesitate to contact us if anything changes with the puppy eating.
How often do you have the puppy OUT of the crate?
It is important to explain to the client:
The puppy needs to be in the crate a majority of the day except for meal times, play times, and bathroom times. Puppies at this age sleep anywhere from 18 to 20 hours a day like a human baby. The crate is similar to a crib which is a safe and comforting place for the puppy to rest. If you have the puppy out too often you can stress the puppy out resulting in low sugar levels and lack of appetite. Even if the puppy falls asleep on your lap, the puppy is not getting the appropriate type of sleep he/she needs, so it is best to put them in their crate.

Can my puppy have snacks/treats?
It is important to keep the puppy on his same diet during the transition into his new home and for housebreaking purposes. For these reasons, we do not recommend any treats since this can upset his stomach and cause diarrhea.

My puppy has diarrhea what do I do?
I’m sorry to hear that the puppy has an upset stomach. This can be common when puppies transition into a new environment. Did you purchase the same food the puppy was on at the kennel or switch the diet? (either Evangers or Annamaet brand).

Change of diet answer- The puppy probably doesn’t like the food that you purchased since it isn’t what he is used to. We highly recommend purchasing the food that the puppy was used to eating since an abrupt change in diet can cause lack of appetite and diarrhea, which can lead to other issues.

Same diet answer- Puppies can be stressed with a change of environment or overly stimulated by too much playtime, both of these things can cause the puppy to eat less.

Follow up questions would be: what does the stool look like? Is it a pudding or watery? What color is it?
If any of the answer mentions seeing blood in the stool, heavy mucus or worms- We suggest making an appointment with your veterinarian (we ask if they have a vet already otherwise we suggest one of the vets on our vet listing) and please bring a fresh sample of the pup’s stool with you so that they can check to see if the puppy needs another worming. In the meantime, to help settle the pup’s stomach and firm up the stool, you can add a little bit of boiled white rice to each meal time until the stool starts to harden.

If the answer is pudding or watery diarrhea we respond- to help settle the pup’s stomach and firm up the stool, please add a little bit of boiled white rice (the instant rice is fine) to each meal time until the stool starts to harden. We also suggest that you cut back on playtime activities as too much exercise can also cause some stress diarrhea to occur.

Crate/housebreaking questions:
Puppies are creatures of habit. Putting the puppy on a schedule will help with housebreaking, and teaching them where and when to potty outside.

Do I have to use the crate? My puppy hates it-
Crate training is proven to be the fasted and most effective way to housebreak the puppy. Puppies are like babies, putting a puppy in the crate is the safest place for the puppy to be, like putting a baby in a crib. The crate ensures that the puppy doesn’t get into any dangerous situations where he could eat something that could harm him. We highly recommend using the crate. The puppy was used to being in a caged environment in the kennel and did well. He just needs some time to adjust to his new surroundings and he will settle down.

My puppy howls/cries in the crate, help!
We suggest that you place the crate in an area that is out of the way of normal foot traffic in the house so he is in a quiet area. You can put a blanket/towel/sheet over the crate to create a den like atmosphere. You can also try putting on a radio in the background to provide some background noise.

My puppy has accidents in the crate, help!
Accidents are normal in the beginning since the puppy doesn’t know the rules or the routine in your home. After the first week or two you will see more improvements each day as you keep to a routine and the puppy understands what is expected of him.

How much space does the puppy have in the crate?
The puppy should have enough room to sit down, laydown, and turnaround. You also don’t want anything absorbent in the crate. Most puppies will use blankets, towels, plush toys, to soak up / cover up their accidents. This defeats the purpose of the crate. If you give the puppy full access to the crate also is counterproductive. You want the puppy to have enough room as mentioned before. This way if they have an accident their forced to sit and stay with it which is what deters them from having accident after accident. A general rule of thumb: for every two weeks they go without an accident move the divider back two spaces, always allowing enough room for them to move around freely as they grow.

What’re you cleaning the accident with?
You do not want to use any ammonia based products. Natures Miracle is what we recommend to use for clean ups but there are other products available at your local pet store that will do the same job. A stain and odor remover that breaks down the enzymes in the accident is what helps stop the puppy from continuously going back to the same spot.

My puppy is having accidents in the house, help!
Accidents are normal in the beginning since the puppy doesn’t know the rules or the routine in your home. Your puppy should never be allowed anywhere in the house unless he is being fully supervised at all times. The puppy should not be allowed free time in the house unless he just went potty outside first. The puppy should not be allowed on any carpeted areas until he is completely housebroken. It is best to interact with the puppy in the kitchen only for the first few weeks for ease of cleanups of accidents and until the puppy really understands the concept of his housebreaking routine.

How should I reprimand my puppy for having accidents in the house/crate?
It’s important to remember that you should never hit your puppy for any reason. If you didn’t see the accident happen, do not reprimand the puppy as he won’t understand. Simply clean up the mess. If the puppy has an accident in front of you, you should immediately say to the puppy in a low, authoritative voice “NO, bad”. If you catch him in the act you can scoop him up and take him outside to finish outside, otherwise immediately clean up the mess. If the accident is during free time in the house the puppy should be put back in the crate.

My puppy keeps chewing on everything including me, help!
Your puppy is teething and will teethe for a few months until his adult teeth come in. Like babies that are teething, their teeth hurt and they will do anything to stop the pain. Do you should provide a large variety of toys for your puppy. Variety is the key since puppies have different things that they like to play with (just like children). 100% all natural rawhide is good for chewing needs. You can soak it in water or chicken broth for about 5 minutes, then freeze it for about 45 minutes to an hour (put in Ziploc back before putting in freezer). This will act like a teething ring. Visit your local pet store weekly to pick up new toys that you think your puppy will enjoy playing with and always remember to buy toys that are larger than your pup’s mouth so you don’t have a choking hazard. Puppies also are attracted to anything that moves. That includes your feet and hands. If the puppy grabs your hand or pants, immediately tell him “no” and offer a toy to play with instead and praise the puppy for taking that toy, but continue to interact with them, don’t expect them to take the toy walk away and be content. Be sure to supervise the puppy at all times when he is free in the house so he doesn’t have the opportunity to chew on furniture or other household items.

When can I give the puppy a bath?
We recommend not bathing the puppy for the first two weeks you have the puppy home. You do not want to stress the puppy more than he/she already is from changing environments. You can spot clean the puppy with a washcloth, washing his face after meals or his paws if he steps in something. If you absolutely HAVE to bathe the puppy, be sure to use only a gentle shampoo specifically made for puppies, warm water, rinse thoroughly, and blow dry with a hair dryer on warm setting (being careful not to burn the puppy). Make sure you don’t get water in his ears or shampoo in his eyes.

Can the puppy go outside?
Yes, the puppy can go outside but only for housebreaking reasons for the first few weeks. Because the puppy has not completed his vaccinations, it is very important that you keep him away from all public areas and anywhere other dogs are. Housebreaking should be done in one spot in your yard preferably. Walks on public streets, visits to dog parks, outings to pet stores, or anywhere to meet other dogs should be avoided until all vaccinations are complete.

How do should I bring my puppy outside for housebreaking?
You want to put the leash and collar on the puppy. Use the word “out” or “bye-bye” so he understands what is about to happen. Walk out the same path, using the same door, and go to the same spot. Plant your feet, and let the puppy go as far as the leash allows. Stand outside for 10-15 minutes with the puppy, if the puppy goes to the bathroom be sure to verbally praise and pet the puppy. If he/she does not go, go inside, put the puppy in the crate for about 5 – 10 minutes, let the puppy “refocus” and then try 1 more time. You want the puppy to work for your verbal praise and pets.

What Shots does the puppy still need/when should he go to the vet?
Typically, the puppy will need a booster 2 weeks after arrival to your home. Vaccination protocols can be different according to each vet and your area. Be sure to bring your inoculation record with you to the vet so he can refer to what vaccines the puppy has already received.

How do I use a crate?
The puppy should have enough room to sit down, laydown, and turnaround. You also don’t want anything absorbent in the crate. Most puppies will use blankets, towels, plush toys, to soak up / cover up their accidents. This defeats the purpose of the crate. If you give the puppy too much room in the crate this can also be counterproductive. What deters them from having accidents is their inability to keep their crate/themselves clean. The puppy should only be out of the crate for bathroom breaks, feeding, and playtimes. You’ll take the puppy out first thing in the morning, after each meal, and last thing before you go to bed at night.

When can I start leaving the puppy out of the crate?
Every puppy is an individual. You need to go slowly and allow the puppy more freedom as he shows his progress in housebreaking and training. This timeframe should include more freedom in the house while supervised, perhaps overnight sleeping in a dog bed next to your bed, eventually leaving him free during times you have to go out of the house for a quick errand. Even with more freedom in the house, most puppies love their crate and you’ll eventually be able to get to the point where you can take the door off the crate and allow the puppy to come and go as he pleases. Sometimes it happens quickly, 6-8 months, other times longer, 2-3 years.